The Forever Watch by David Ramirez

One-sentence synopsis: The world has ended, and Hana happily lives aboard the Noah, a giant spaceship transporting the remainder of humanity on a hundreds-of-years journey to a distant planet – until she discovers there’s a grisly secret.

It’s a bad sign when you go to write a review of a book finished a couple of days ago and think: “gosh, what was that about again?” The Forever Watch was recommended to me by a friend, and as a dystopia enthusiast, I was excited about reading it. I was partly rewarded, but mostly left unfulfilled.

First, I will say that this is an ambitious and well realised sci fi world. The author sets up a meticulously detailed civilisation inside the massive spaceship Noah where a whole population lives and works together to keep the spaceship running as efficiently as possible on its long journey to the distant planet where humanity will eventually repopulate. Everyone has a role according to their talents, and everyone’s talents are somehow augmented. There is a complicated, cool system of tapping into humans’ powers to achieve different things and to communicate in a way that is fascinating and compelling (and explained with slightly too much detail).

Descriptions of life onboard the Noah take up the first third of the book, and this was my favorite part – though I’ve read other reviews complaining that this part dragged. It clearly depends on whether the reader’s taste is for daily life in a dystopia (me) or murder mystery hijinks and peril (really not me). The last two thirds of the book involves a complicated hunt for the truth, involving a certain amount of highly complicated technology use. This was done reasonably well though I kept getting confused about what was happening.

The element of the book that put me off the most was Hanna’s relationship with ‘my man’, ‘my lion’, ‘my beast’, aka her unconventional boyfriend, a policeman with a mission to uncover a secret, which he draws her into. Every time she spoke about him like that, it made me cringe, and like both of them less.

There were all sorts of fascinating questions explored in this book, and the dystopia was well realized. Other than her sloppy soppy way of referring to her boyfriend, I liked Hanna a lot as a main character. Plus the ending is good.

The reviews I’ve read have mostly been glowing. Personally, I can name about 30 sci fi books I’ve enjoyed more. Nevertheless, an interesting read. But one I nearly ditched with a third of the book to go due to boredom, irritation, and lack of taste for murder mysteries…

Rating: 3/5 shoes

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